Menu

St Richard'sCE Primary School

Bold Bright Beautiful

Search Search
Translate Translate

Computing

COMPUTING AT ST RICHARD'S

OUR INTENT

 

Technology is changing the lives of everyone. Through our computing curriculum, we aim to equip our children to participate in a rapidly changing world where work and leisure activities are increasingly influenced by technology, both as consumers and creators.

The curriculum will teach children key knowledge about how computers and computer systems work, and how they are designed and programmed. Learners will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of computational systems of all kinds, whether or not they include computers.

Our intention is that Computing also supports children’s creativity and cross-curricular learning to engage children and enrich their experiences in school and at home. We believe that a child’s chances of being a productive and safe digital citizen are greatly improved by involving families in the conversation: therefore, we strive to support and encourage parents and carers to set boundaries and share in their child’s online experiences.

All our children should leave Year 6 as safe and responsible digital citizens with the ability to confidently engage with and utilise key technologies, both in their on-g

Technology is changing the lives of everyone. Through our computing curriculum, we aim to equip our children to participate in a rapidly changing world where work and leisure activities are increasingly influenced by technology, both as consumers and creators. We recognise that a range of cultural and financial influences can greatly impact a child’s access to technology and their cultural capital in this area. We aim to ensure that children from all backgrounds gain the exposure they need to inspire and empower them.

The curriculum will teach children key knowledge about how computers and computer systems work, and how they are designed and programmed. Learners will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of computational systems of all kinds, whether or not they include computers.

Our intention is that Computing also supports creativity and cross-curricular learning to engage children and enrich their experiences in school and at home. We believe that a child’s chances of being a productive and safe digital citizen are greatly improved by involving families in the conversation: therefore, we strive to support and encourage parents and carers to set boundaries and share in their child’s online experiences. Touch-typing is nurtured as a life skill for all pupils, particularly for children with barriers to handwriting.

All our children should leave Year 6 as safe and responsible digital citizens with the ability to confidently engage with and utilise key technologies, both in their on-going learning and in their life in general.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE COMPUTING CURRICULUM

 

By the time they leave St Richard’s, children will have gained key knowledge and skills in the three main areas of the computing curriculum: Computer Science (coding, programming and understanding how digital systems work), Information Technology (using computer systems to store, retrieve and send information) and Digital Literacy (evaluating digital content and using technology safely and respectfully).

 

The children will have experiences of all three strands in each year group, but the subject knowledge imparted becomes increasingly specific and in depth. For example, in the Early Years, children experiment with Bee-Bots and learn about sequential instructions (e.g. for making a sandwich). Then in Key Stage 1, children use computers to control on-screen sprites using LGFL JiT, before progressing to ‘block’ programming with LGFL Visual and finally text-based programming in Key Stage 2 using LGFL Logo. Much of our learning, including coding and publishing, is done within the LGFL (London Grid For Learning) suite of resources. These provide the equivalent of other coding platforms such as Scratch, and other publishing software such as Word, but all contained within our own on-line learning space, with familiar controls and interfaces. This platform allows children to save their progress in school and at home and share their files with their teachers.

The planning for each of the three curriculum strands is structured to develop skills incrementally, year-on-year, but with opportunities for learning objectives to be revisited, allowing for consolidation, independent application, or ‘gap filling’ depending on the needs of each individual child. Children who were already secure in that area will be supported to apply their skills independently in new areas. Embedded within these lessons will be opportunities to practise core skills such as logging on, managing passwords, saving work, touch typing and effective research skills using the internet. In addition to discrete computing lessons, employing cross-curricular links motivates pupils and supports them to make connections and remember the steps they have been taught. We make links to local history with a trip to the nearby National Physical Laboratory at Bushy House, and key historical figures such as Alan Turing and Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web.

To ensure high-quality teaching and learning, staff subject knowledge is regularly surveyed, and appropriate refresher courses, resources and peer support are made available. Children’s work is regularly moderated by the in-school subject co-ordinator, both internally and in liaison with local schools.

The long term overview for computing for Years 1 - 6, mapped to meet the National Curriculum requirements, is below.

The information below identifies the intent, implementation and impact of our Computing curriculum for the Early Years Foundation Stage, Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2.

IMPACT OF THE COMPUTING CURRICULUM

 

Our whole curriculum is shaped by our school vision which aims to enable all children, regardless of background, ability, additional needs, to flourish and become the very best version of themselves they can possibly be. We expect children from all backgrounds and with all levels of ability to be inspired to see computing and its related industries as a valid, aspirational career-route.

Whilst it is all but impossible to predict the exact nature of the technological developments children will encounter in the decades to come, it is clear that actively producing content will become just as important as passively consuming. The implementation of this curriculum ensures that when children leave St Richard’s, they will have developed the confidence, skills and enthusiasm they need to express themselves creatively and protect themselves and others responsibly, in Key Stage 3 and beyond.

Top